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On 22 September 1999 03:27, Mark S. Bevelhimer, wrote:
 
 
>   Hope some of you caught the show (title same as subject above) on
> Australia's Great Southern Ocean last night on the Discovery Channel.
I've
> been watching diving documentaries/travelogues since J.C. first donned
that
> little red hat, and this was one of the best IMO.  Good enough to bring me
> out of quasi-eternal lurkdom to mention it.  Not a diver to be seen, but
> lots of cool animal behavior.  Carpet sharks eating octopi, hermit crabs
> adorning shells with anemones, sea horses sucking down prey, Tasmanian
> giant crabs breaking up all kinds of stuff, and, as if that wasn't enough
> to make you warm your wet suit, a little gratuitous cuttlefish sex for
> added spice.
 
G'Day, Mark!
 
Julian and Helen are down in South Australia at this very moment, so he's
not able to tell you about the giant 'Killer Kuttlefish' that decided he'd
make a suitable partner!  :-)
 
>I checked the Discovery lineup for rest of this week and
> didn't see any replay, but maybe another time. However, there is another
> show on GBR tonight during the Wild Discovery time slot (or is that
> yesterday to you folks down under?).
 
Yep!  We're already into your tomorrow!  :-)
 
> P.S. Strike and other Aussies, is it true carpet sharks are responsible
for
> more shark bites to humans than any other species?
 
I don't know!  There's lots of anecdotal stories about people who mistakenly
assumed that because the wobbegongs are so seemingly lethargic that it's
safe to touch them!  The only problem with that is that if you're the
umpteenth diver of the day to swim by and give it a prod they just may take
offence and decide to latch on to you!  Because they have grinding plates,
rather than jagged, pointed teeth, the injury may be little more than severe
bruising, but the main injury is to pride!  They're tenacious bastards!
Once they latch on, they're loathe to let go!  Exiting the water with a
2-metre wobbegong latched on to your shoulder while you're busy punching it,
is not a good advertisement for diving's prominent role in underwater
conservation!  :-)
 
Like Birdo said, we eat more of them than they do of us!  :-)
 
Strike