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Bob LeCh.:
 
> > > international vocabulary is useful ONLY to those who have studied a second
> > > European language and OBSERVED what kinds of words are "international".
 
Charles:
 
> >No, contrarily. All you need is English OR French OR ...
> >My method is this: I need an international word for rock or stone.
> >I think "xxhmmxxtion, stonifixx, petrification, petre!"
>
> >The international words are found in their derivatives in all languages.
> >So seriously, you know probably 90% before even beginning to study.
>
> >Take a random sample of text from any newspaper, grab the -tion, -al,
> >and -ive words. What do you see? These words are international already.
 
The trouble is, even if you take all the widely diffused -ive and -ion plus other obvious Latinisms like _nocturnal_, plus all the no-brainers like _hotel_ and _cigarette_, you don't have enough vocabulary for a workable language. That's not even considering the problem of grammatical words.
 
So you need some way of filling out the lexicon. IALA went about it by first defining a minimum list of concepts to provided for (Eaton's list) then defining selection and standardisation criteria for deriving the vocabulary. This methodology was in principal infinitely extendible; IALA stopped at 27,000 items for their dictionary, but they could have listed the entire body of neo-Latin technical and scientific terminology if they'd wanted to. Those words are, of course, *in* Interlingua, they're just not in the dictionary.
 
Cheers,
 
Chris