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Robert J. Petry, C.L. wrote:
 
 
> There should be material for everyone at
> every stage of development in using the language.
 
The question wasn't "What should be available for learners?" It was "What do you
(which I took personally to mean me, Michael Farris) want to read in an IAL. I did
fudge a little and changed the question slightly and turned it into (I think a more
important question) namely "What would it take to get me (Michael Farris) to actually
learn a given IAL well? (as opposed to half-assed Eo and some passive reading
knowledge of half a dozen others).
 
Time for an unpleasant truth: I don't especially care for most IAL's. I don't find
them interesting as languages. This makes me a very poor promoter of existing
auxlangs but does make me more like normal people than is usually the case for me
(for completely different reasons, but that's a different post).
 
The answer is: Material in fields I'm professionally involved in (linguistics and
related fields that deal with human behavior) or especially interested in. This last
is hard to pin down, but I'm definitely not interested in learning an IAL to read
literature (fiction, poetry)  in it or to read about the history of IAL's. As Chris
Burd, said (paraphrasing) the language itself doesn't have to be interesting, but
what people are doing with it needs to be important.
 
The only way to get me interested in an auxlang (besides Eo, which I have made sort
of a committment to and which I'm not yet convinced is worthless) is to get people to
start using it in the public areas of life (not as Eo, a private hobby akin to stamp
collecting).
 
I've got ideas about how to get that started (though for all the interest in that
topic shown here I could just keep talking to the wall).
 
 
-amike(men/te)
mike farris