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Chris Burd wrote:
 
[snipped alot]
 
>>> Then, add a -t after every -men you can, plus an -e.
>>> Then, take every Occidental word ending in -bil, or -ibil, and add -e, etc.
 
> That's an interesting point. You know, final -le, -ne, and -re
> actually do something. They indicate stress on the antepenultimate.
> 'hOmine' as opposed to 'canIn'. Occ. 'amabil' is pronounced
> 'amAbil', isn't it? But you have to learn a rule for the suffix
> -bil. In Ia, 'amAbile' is covered by the -le/-ne/-re rule. The final
> -e is like a diacritic. It probably covers half the exceptions to
> the general rule of stress preceding the final consonant.
 
The only real useful use of stress is to mark word boundaries.
As long as the goal is accomplished and it sounds pretty,
it's good enough. OCC can do without any accent marks.
Generally, stress is on the penultimate syllable of the root,
but some endings steal the stress. Not a problem at all.
 
> what modern European language uses 'mult'? :-)
 
Which one doesn't use "multi"? OCC "mult" is used *optionally* when
preceding a word beginning with a vowel, 'cause it sounds purty.
The rule is, drop the -i if you feel like it, otherwise don't.
If you drop too many, though, you lose.
 
--
As they say in Tepa: hike waipettu.