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Once upon a time, either Dr. Gode or Mario Pei, when
describing Gode's position, did a hypothetical translation
of a text into a hypothetical IAL form using not just
European but a proportion of Asian roots:
 
> The text in English:
 
  > The sun says: My name is sun. I am very brilliant. I rise in the
  > east, and when I rise it is day. I look through your window with my
  > eye as bright as gold, and I tell you when it is time to get up.
  > And I say to you: Lazy one, get up. I don't shine so that you may
  > stay in bed sleeping, but that you may get up and work, that you
  > read and go walking.
 
The Hypothetical semi-Asian Interlingua translation was :
 
  > Mata-hari yu: Wo-ti nama mata-hari. Wo taihen brillante. Wo leva
  > wo a est, dan toki wo leva wo, ada hari. Wo miru per ni-ti fenestra
  > sama wo-ti mata brillante como kin, dan wo yu ni toki ada tempo a
  > levar ni. Dan wo yu ni: Sust, leva ni. Wo non brilla sam-rap ni
  > tomaru a toko a nemuru, sed wo brilla sam-rap ni leva ni, dan que
  > ni suru kam, ni yomu, dan ni aruku.
 
The point was to show that the use of nonEuropean roots
would lead to a loss of recognizability for everyone,
and gain little for Asians.
 
It is mentioned several places (including Pei's "One Language
for the World" 1958) but I'd like to clarify the origin? Was
this something done by Gode?
 
And more importantly, how would this text come out in
normal Interlingua?
 
Or in Esperanto -- or other languages?
 
Best regards,
 
Leo J. Moser
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