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On 07 November 1999 01:26, Lee Bell wrote (to illustrate a point to Chris):
 
(snip)
> Recently, I was diving nitrox.  The fill station used a oxygen analyzer
> signficantly different from the ones I am used to.  One of the rules of
> nitrox, at least as I learned it, is "test your own gas."
 
There is absolutely NO excuse for an individual not to analyse for
themselves the mix that they intend to use and then being able to calculate
the Maximum Operating Depth of that mix.  I have seen several instances
where people who are nitrox certified accept that the mix they intend to use
is exactly what the blender/tester states that is and then - because they
also lack the ability to calculate MOD's - dive to the supposed limit of
that mix as stated by the tester.
 
To do so shows blind faith in the competence of the person carrying out the
analysis;  a lack of regard for one's own safety; and also demonstrates a
lack of proper understanding of the limitations of using nitrox.
 
(snip)
> I requested help understanding the use of
> the ayalyzer, was shown how to use it properly and then tested my gas
myself
> under the watchful eye of the tech.  This did several things for me:
> 1. It allowed me to be sure I knew what mix I would be breathing because I
> had tested it myself.
> 2. It taught me to use the unfamiliar equipment properly.
> 3. It told the tech that I have a committment to self reliance and safe
> diving, the sense to understand when something is beyond my knowledge and
> the maturity to admit my lack of knowledge and do something to cure it.
 
For many people who dive, the hardest lesson of all to learn is the ability
to ask for help or to admit to uncertainty - or even to just say, 'NO'! when
they're uncomfortable with a particular dive plan!
 
> 4. It gave me knowledge that I'll be able to share with the next diver who
> seems to have the same unfamiliarity as I did and then watch him test his
> gas for himself, spreading my concept of self reliance the only way it can
> really be shared, by example.
 
Lee!  That's excellent advice!  :-)
 
Strike