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"Bob LeChevalier (lojbab)" wrote:
 
> > > "Robert J. Petry, C.L." wrote:
> > > [kut]Well, I don't know about Lojbab, but I'm a teacher of English, I
> > > have a BA in English and an MA in Applied Linguistics. How much
> > > more do I need to do to become "learned" in my own language? You
> > > want a PhD or what?
> >
> >I wasn't speaking of anyone specifically. However, since you have the
> >degrees would you give us the correct meaning of the list of word building
> >parts I gave, without looking at a dictionary?
> >For instance, what does the "y" mean that we put on the end of words?
>
> It doesn't "mean" anything.
 
Ah, but it does.
 
> Looking at the list of morphemes that you
 
Hmmm? "Morphemes".[kut]
IMHO, it is ONLY by assuming that English is predominantly a Romance
 
> language building words in the Latinate way, that one could call these
> "English morphemes".
 
I don't remember callling them morphemes, you did.
 
> >  And, the rest of the list I gave? I should have listed all 259. [In
> > fact, if anyone wishes, or enough of the list wishes, I'll be glad to
> > list all of them here.] I'll trust that you will do it off the top of
> > your head and not "look up any meanings". [note: I'm just giving a
> > friendly ribbing. The first time I saw
> >the list I could not give the meaning of all of them.]
>
> Skimming the list, I was able to guess somewhat less than half, and half of
> the remaining, I could identify a word or two that was Latinate and used
> the word, but have no idea what the "meaning" is.  In about 10%, I was able
> to identify multiple meanings.  And for many, like "y", I simply deny that
> they have a "meaning" at all, as opposed to a function.
 
This is what I mean when I say our "learned" including myself, do not know our
own langauges. When we do, and I'm not just talking about English, then
Occidental is extremely simple.
 
> >But, I am courious, now that you bring this up.
> >
> >Who can, without cheating, tell us want they all mean?
>
> Nice trick.  Anyone who can do that is of course conceding your claim that
> O. is easy to learn and based on "recognizable roots".  The flaw being that
> most English speakers are not sufficiently "educated" (i.e. they never
> studied etymology) to know even as many as I know (I used to read
> dictionaries for pleasure).
 
Not a trick at all. But your are substantiating my point, most "learned" people
do not know their own langauge first, much less trying to fathom a "foreign" or
"international auxiliary" language.
 
So, anyone, without looking know what "y" at the end of English words means? It
does have a meaning, and once one sees that meaning, then the understanding
immediately jumps when seeing words that use it to an even higher level.
 
here are some samples.
cheery
catty
arty
crafty
furry
dreary
faulty
dirty
smarty
foxy
hairy
itchy
misty
pretty
rosy
salty
sleepy
slinky
wary
 
 
Y is Key no 1. Let me quote this for everyone.
"Key no. 1 is the Suffix Y which means INCLINED TO; TEND TO. It is a very
valuable KEY because it shows its effectiveness so clearly. That single letter
added to a root word has an immediate and powerful effect. It characterizes, not
the root word, but the person to whom the adjective is applied. Example: smart is
a complimentary word, of genuine praise, smartY shows up a fake. Being shown this
difference has changed many a smart-aleck into a genuinely smart person."
 
cheery cheer Y Tends to see the bright side;
catty catt Y Tends to be stealthy;
arty art Y Inclined to be artistic but not really so.
 
SMARTY-- No. 9 [in the list]
SMART - Root = bright; clever
Y - Suffix = inclined to; tend to
 
One of the equivalent meanings in Occidental is the -ie ending that replaces -y
in many words.
 
Cordialmen, [i.e. Cordial-ly, -men replaces -ly. What does -ly mean? For, if you
understand this, and that in Occidental -men replaces -ly, then you understand
better Occidental words like solmen, cordialmen, etc. when you see them.] -ly is
"Key Nr. 6" in understanding the English language, so that it becomes "at sight"
readable to an English speaker when they first see words and don't have a
dictionary to run to.
 
I wonder, does anyone care to see all 259, or is this enough?
 
Bob, x+O~