Print

Print


On Sun, 5 Dec 1999, Kjell Rehnstr=F6m skrev:
> Charles wrote:
> > Pierpaolo Bernardi wrote:
 
> > > I wanted to know if the suffix -men does keep its ethymological origi=
n of
> > > 'mind'.  Note: this is a real curiosity, not motivated by any languag=
e war.
 
> Si tu parla de _-men_ come desinentie adverbial, to es
> _occidental/interlinguEEEE_ e corresponde a _mente_ in interlinguAAAAA de
> IALA. COMPARATION:
 
I'm not sure whether my question is clear to you.  What I wanted to
know was simply if the Occ. word for 'mind' was 'men' or not.
 
> The professor (teacher) talked in an eloquent way about the new invention=
=2E
> As you see the corresponding ending in Interlingua of IALA is _-mente_.
> frequentemente, possibilemente, habilemente etc. (so it has nothing to do=
 with
> _mental_ as in _mental state_.)
 
Why not?  Maybe English speakers do not realize this, but that is its
origin. 'The professor talked (with) eloquent-mind about...'
 
> The stress of -men in Occidental is interesting, because it shows one of =
the
> problemes that a schematic language (there are different temperatures in =
hell)
> may use and what problems they can pose. As far as I know in all the lang=
uages
> where _*mente_ can be used as an ending it is stressed. (I cannot provide
> examples in Italian, Spanish or French, as my knowledge of them is too
 
I can only confirm that it is always stressed in Italian (as it should be
expected, being nothing other than the word 'mente' which got struck
together with the preceding one).
 
Cheers,
  Pierpaolo