Print

Print


My wife (an eastern Iowan by birth) pronounces the "l" in "walk" and
"talk."  Sounds really weird to me.
 
But the thing I don't get is that a few years ago, I first heard the
construction, "that shirt needs washed" from my wife.  (I would say,
"that shirt needs to be washed," or "that shirt needs washing."  To
me, "washed" is not a nominal, and therefore cannot be used as the
direct object of "needs," whereas "to be washed" and "washing" are
both nominals.)
 
Now I'm noticing it in the speech of almost everyone I know from the
midwest.  But I *never* heard it, growing up in Michigan.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                       [log in to unmask]
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 
Nik Taylor wrote:
 
> nicole perrin wrote:
> > I noticed this in John's post too - I distinctly say /balm/, as well as
> > /kalm/ and /kwalm/ and /alms/, is this abnormal?
>
> A lot of l-consonant clusters, especially /lm/, tend to vary in whether
> or not /l/ is pronounced.  I say both /almz/ and /amz/, as well as
> /kA(l)m/, /kwA(l)m/, and /bA(l)m/
>
> --
> "Old linguists never die - they just come to voiceless stops." -
> anonymous
> http://members.tripod.com/~Nik_Taylor/X-Files
> http://members.tripod.com/~Nik_Taylor/Books.html
> ICQ: 18656696
> AIM Screen-Name: NikTailor