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My copy of SCUBA Diver magazine arrived yesterday and I had a chance to
read Strikes article on the proposed guidelines for scientific diving,
which clarified things a lot.  Obviously the proof of the pudding is in the
eating but what I read sounded promissing.
 
At 13:49 7/12/1999 -0500, Lee wrote:
>Shucks guys, work is easy to define.  It's what I have to be paid to do or,
>in special circumstances, would normally have to be paid to do.  There are
>cases where I do "work" for others without pay.
 
A colleague was suprised the other day when I told him I work at the dive
shop on weekends and holidays for free.  While it would be nice to get paid
I do receive other benefits; free diving (including air/tanks and
occasionally equipment to use on other dives), discounts on dive gear
purchases, access to dive sites for data collection, occasionally access to
dive sites for students I'm helping with projects, the chance to do surveys
for Fisheries while leading dives and off-course I can log my boat hours
toward my coxswains (not to mention free BBQ's and beer).
 
I think the important thing is that what you do is valued.  Perhaps
tightening up regulations covering scientific and recreational diving may
make appropriately qualified/experienced people a more valued asset?
 
>Let me know how this works out.  I'm planning on doing some research after
>retirement myself.  The plan is to make my expensive boating and diving
>habits fit the definition of work for tax purposes, defraying some cost
>through depreciation and expense write off.
 
It's tricky, you normally have to identify a direct link with income.  Up
until now I haven't bothered, although I think I have a fair case it would
involve a lot more messing about than my usual tax returns.
 
>> I'd certainly agree that using large capacity lift bags and surface supply
>> gas would require specialist training.
>
>Hopefully, everyone on the list would agree.  I've long been convinced that
>the risk you don't know exists is the one most likely to cause you problems.
>I suspect that use of lift bags carries all sorts of risks that are easily
>overlooked along with the few that are obvious.
 
Though I've used them a bit and had limited training I'd definately benefit
from additional training in the use of lift bags.  I've learnt a few
lessons the hard way.
 
>My personal opinion is that there is a good reason for commercial divers and
>specialized training to prepare them to work safely.  I know of absolutely
>no agency that I consider competent to provide adequate training for
>commercial diving but suspect all of them could provide some training in
>aspects that cross the line between commercial and recreational diving.
 
I think the people giving any training need to be involved with the
activity they are training people for.  So they can help meld a skill into
the overall activity and are aware of potential problems that may arise.
 
If the new standards identify activities (like surface supply) that are
outside the scope of otherwise appropriately qualified scientific divers,
well and good.
 
Simon
 
Simon L Hartley
RSM Unit Web Administrator\First Year Course Coordinator
Associate Lecturer
School of Resource Science and Management
Southern Cross University
P.O. Box 157
Lismore NSW, Australia 2480
Ph: (02) 66203251 or (61 66) 203 251
Fax:(02) 66212669
E-mail: [log in to unmask]
 
http://www.scu.edu.au/staff_pages/shartley/index.html