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Yesterday being the southern hemisphere summer solstice - and the moon being
full and at its closest point to earth in seventy or so years - Dave, Helen,
Julian and myself went for a night dive to Shelly Beach.  (We decided to
break with the traditional sacrificing of virgins by Druids on the grounds
that in Australia you just can't get the quality ingredients!)  :-)

A dozen or so other divers had the same idea.

The moon, regrettably, was hidden by a cloud layer.  Not that we were short
on lights!  I took my primary light; a back-up light; a strobe; a back-up
strobe and a cyalume.  (Not for my benefit, you understand, but more for any
searching vessels that might have to look for me at night on a dark sea!)
:-)

Not that having so much light made any difference.  Knowing Shelly Beach
like the back of my hand - and with my unerring navigational instincts - I
still managed to get lost!  :-)

We saw hundreds of small stripeys; rays; a puse-yellow coloured estuary
catfish; cuttlefish; squid; a hunting octopus; a small lion fish that seems
to have taken up permanent residency on one of the large boulders; small
groupers; and - hiding beneath a rock ledge - a timid cat-shark.

Exiting the water after the dive, Garry - who'd had to abort the dive
following an equipment problem and had waited on the shoreline - told us
about the luck of two divers who'd surfaced a short while before lugging a
large anchor and chain!

The thieving gits had nicked the anchor that Adrian and I had found on
Saturday at the furthest point of our dive. The same anchor that we'd huffed
and puffed over and hauled to shallower water before abandoning it under a
rock shelf for later collection! :-)

I tried to console myself with the thought that hopefully they'd suffered a
hernia! :-)

Strike